Why Are Nitric Oxide Levels Important?

Nitric Oxide was first discovered by Dr. Robert Furchgott in 1980 as a vasodilating substance produced by the cells lining our blood vessels, or endothelial cells.
Dr. Furchgott was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1998 along with 2 other scientists for the discovery of the critical cardiovascular role of nitric oxide.  The American Heart Association noted in an interview that “the discovery of nitric oxide and its function is one of the most important in the history of cardiovascular medicine.”

Nitric Oxide is a signaling molecule.  When it’s created and released, this gas easily and quickly penetrates nearby membranes and cells, sending its signals.  In less than a second, NO(nitric oxide) signals arteries to relax and expand, immune cells to kill bacterial and cancer cells, and brain cells to communicate with each other.

When we are young and healthy, our artery cells produce NO through L-arginine efficiently.  People over 40 years of age probably don’t create enough NO  and it creates 50% loss in endothelial function in normal healthy adults who have no other cardiovascular risk except being over 40.  Testing your nitric oxide levels are available now and supplementation using L-arginine, NEO 40 daily product and/or Organic Greens & Reds can boost nitric oxide levels in the body.  Keeping adequate levels of nitric oxide levels will prevent high blood pressure, keep arteries young and flexible, prevent slow or reverse buildup of artery-clogging arterial plaques, help stop the formation of artery-clogging blood clots and reduce inflammation.  Nitric Oxide has also been linked to improving sexual function in both men and women, reduce risk of diabetes and conditions related to diabetes such as foot and leg ulcers, blindness and amputations.  As well as swelling and pain of arthritis, inflammation of ashthma, protect bones from osteoporosis, assist the immune system in killing bacteria.

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